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Congressman John Larson

Representing the 1st District of Connecticut

Larson Votes for Connecticut Priorities

September 26, 2018
Press Release
House Approves Larson’s Funding Request for 93 F-35s

Washington, D.C. – Today, Rep. John B. Larson (CT-01) voted to pass the Fiscal Year 2019 Defense and Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations bill.

“I was proud to vote to pass this bipartisan spending agreement, that will continue to fuel Connecticut’s thriving defense manufacturing base, supporting high-skilled jobs and billions of dollars of economic activity in the First District. From Pratt & Whitney to our almost 160 small & medium sized manufacturers like ACMT in Manchester, the ingenuity of Connecticut’s high-skilled workforce keeps the eagle flying. Work on the F-35 alone supports more than 4,600 jobs in the First District, resulting in $545 million in economic activity. This is the second year in a row that more than 90 F-35s were ordered, and this is a big win for our district. Along with my fellow co-chair of the Joint Strike Fighter Caucus, Congressman Tom Rooney (R-FL), we led the request for 93 F-35 Joint Strike Fighters to be included in this bill. I was honored to work with him to boost Connecticut’s economy and continue to support our men and women in uniform. This funding for the F-35 program, our submarines, and our military’s helicopter programs will ensure that our military has the tools they need and continues to have an enormous economic impact on our state,” said Larson.

“Thanks to the tireless efforts of Connecticut’s own Rosa DeLauro, a senior member of the Appropriations Committee, we are also increasing federal investments in programs that families in the First District depend on to put food on the table and send their kids to school. We are dedicating new resources towards the fight against the opioids epidemic, for our community health centers that care for our most vulnerable residents, for education and apprenticeships, and towards Head Start programs. We are increasing funding for programs essential to our seniors such as Meals on Wheels and the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP). As the lead Democrat on the Social Security Subcommittee, I also pushed for increased funding for the Social Security Administration to better serve beneficiaries, because this isn’t an entitlement, it is the insurance that they have paid for through a lifetime of work.”

Larson led the bipartisan funding request for 93 F-35 Joint Strike Fighters which was met with unprecedented support, and the request was fully funded in this defense agreement.

Highlights of Connecticut's defense manufacturing priorities:

  • $9.4 billion to purchase 93 F-35 Joint Strike Fighters
  • $2.3 billion for advance procurement of B-21 Long Range Strike Bomber
  • $2.8 billion in advance procurement and $4.3 billion for 2 Virginia-class submarines
  • $2.3 billion for 15 KC-46A Tankers
  • $3.2 billion for advanced procurement of Ohio Replacement Program
  • $1.2 billion for 58 UH-60 Blackhawks
  • $1.1 billion for purchase 8 CH-53K Heavy Lift Helicopters
  • $660 million for procurement of 10 Combat Search and Rescue Helicopters and $445 million in research and development for a new combat rescue helicopter
  • $649 million for procurement and $245 million research and development of VH-92A Presidential Helicopter
  • $181 million for C-130H Modernization, including $55 million for eight blade propeller upgrades and $74 million for the engine enhancement program

Highlights of Connecticut’s Health, Education, and Labor priorities:

  • $15.9 billion for Title I public schools and $107 million for magnet schools
  • $12.9 billion for the Social Security Administration’s operating budget
  • $10 billion for Head Start
  • $7.9 billion for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  • $5.6 billion in total funding for Community Health Centers (both discretionary and mandatory)
  • $5.3 billion for the Child Care and Development Block Grant
  • $4.4 billion to respond to the opioids crisis
  • $3.7 billion for the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP)
  • $2.3 billion for Ryan White HIV/AIDs programs
  • $2 billion increase for biomedical research through the National Institutes of Health (NIH)
  • $1.47 billion for congressionally directed medical research programs on cancer, traumatic brain injuries, breast cancer, and prostate cancer studies
  • $1.3 billion for Career and Technical Education
  • $1.3 billion for Unaccompanied Minor Children
  • $907 million for Senior Nutrition Programs
  • $160 million for Apprenticeships and $300 million for Veterans job training

 

 

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